READ Õ Na Drini ćuprija



10 thoughts on “Na Drini ćuprija

  1. says:

    History builds its monuments on the human blood History is a cruel mistressThe common people remember and tell of what they are able to grasp and what they are able to transform into legend Anything else passes them by without deeper trace with the dumb indifference of nameless natural phenomena which do not touch the imagination or remain in the memory This hard and long building process was for them a foreign task undertaken at another'

  2. says:

    Na Drini ćuprija The Bridge on the Drina Bosnian Trilogy #1 Ivo AndrićThe story spans about four centuries and covers the Ottoman and Austro Hungarian occupations of the region with a particular emphasis on the lives destinies and relations of the local inhabitants especially Serbs and Bosnian MuslimsA great stone bridge built th

  3. says:

    Finished About a bridge a beautiful bridge Through this bridge one finds hope But the book is also about the passage of time and the folly of man and the peoples and cultures of the Balkans One percieves the smallness of man There are no clear answers Is it foolish to hope for a better future and what is better? How does one judge progress? If there is kindness isn't life good? People are weak and mean and foolish but at the same time the

  4. says:

    Spanning centuries in time The Bridge on the Drina is one monumental work that pulled me in right from the off Set on and around the bridge the little town of Višegard and all its surroundings hamlets nestling in the folds

  5. says:

    Images and myths purport to the mythic Ivo Andric crafted a monument to those expectations in his novel of stories He challenges the eternal w

  6. says:

    “Between the fear that something would happen and the hope that still it wouldn't there is much space than one thinks On that nar

  7. says:

    Beautiful stories centered around one bridge following the society and individual fates throughout centuries It made me feel nostalgic and melancholic like most Bosnian authors make me feel It reminded me of writings of Meša Selimović who is one of my favorite authors I admire Ivo Andrić ability to shape and describe characters they felt so alive and so deeply tragic Some of the stories were too heart breaki

  8. says:

    About five years ago an American friend of mine whose book taste I completely respected told me about this book He was so enthusiastic I knew someday I would read it even though I had never heard of the author never heard of

  9. says:

    Stunning sweeping and awesome fiction book that gives the history of the Balkans through the lens of the life of

  10. says:

    Ivo Andric's chronicle is a series of utterly engaging vignettes that bring to life Bosnia's rich and troubled history Se

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REVIEW õ THECOLCHESTERCIRCLE.CO.UK Ô Ivo Andrić

Το γεφύρι του Δρίνου δεν είναι μόνο ένα σημαντικό μυθιστόρημα Είναι ένα βαλκανικό χρονικό τεσσάρων αιώνων ιστορίας τεσσάρων θρησκειών και τριών εθνοτήτων που μοιράζονται τον ίδιο τόπο την πόλη Βίσιεγκραντ στη Βοσνία Στο κέντ. History builds its monuments on the human blood History is a cruel mistressThe common people remember and tell of what they are able to grasp and what they are able to transform into legend Anything else passes them by without deeper trace with the dumb indifference of nameless natural phenomena which do not touch the imagination or remain in the memory This hard and long building process was for them a foreign task undertaken at another s expense Only when as the fruit of this effort the great bridge arose men began to remember details and to embroider the creation of a real skilfully built and lasting bridge with fabulous tales which they well knew how to weave and to rememberThe bridge is built and it becomes a witness of history And it becomes an inanimate partaker in all the events around it And it mutely participates in lives of those who surround itTwo buttresses had been built on each side of the central pier which had been splayed out towards the top so that to right and left of the roadway there were two terraces daringly and harmoniously projecting outwards from the straight line of the bridge over the noisy green waters far below The two terraces were about five paces long and the same in width and were bordered as was the whole length of the bridge by a stone parapet Otherwise they were open and uncovered That on the right as one came from the town was called the sofa It was raised by two steps and bordered by benches for which the parapet served as a back steps benches and parapet were all made of the same shining stone That on the left opposite the sola was similar but without benches In the middle of the parapet the stone rose higher than a man and in it near the top was inserted a plaue of white marble with a rich Turkish inscription a tarih with a carved chronogram which told in thirteen verses the name of the man who built the bridge and the year in which it was built Near the foot of this stone was a fountain a thin stream of water flowing from the mouth of a stone snake On this part of the terrace a coffee maker had installed himself with his copper vessels and Turkish cups and ever lighted charcoal brazier and an apprentice who took the coffee over the way to the guests on the sofa Such was the kapiaOn the bridge and its kapia about it or in connection with it flowed and developed as we shall see the life of the townsmen In all tales about personal family or public events the words on the bridge could always be heard Indeed on the bridge over the Drina were the first steps of childhood and the first games of boyhoodTime flies centuries pass by Empires rise and empires fall Times of peace and times of war Times of tranuility and times of tumult And man must adjust to any changes or perishit would have been hard to find two worse negotiators or unsuited contestants Nothing could have been expected of them than increasing general anxiety and the creation of one uarrel the That was to be regretted but there was nothing to be done about it for such moments of social upset and great inevitable change usually throw up just such men unbalanced and incomplete to turn things inside out or lead them astray That is one of the signs of times of disorderPeople are born and people die but their grandiose creations remain standing as the silent sentries of history

FREE READ Na Drini ćuprija

Na Drini ćuprija

ρο όλων αυτών το γεφύρι αμετακίνητο από τη θέση του σαν το πεπρωμένο που διατρέχει πότε φωτεινό και πότε σκοτεινό τις ανθρώπινες ζωές Μόνο αν διαβάσει κανείς το προφητικό αυτό έργο μπορεί πραγματικά να κατανοήσει τα τραγικά γε. Between the fear that something would happen and the hope that still it wouldn t there is much space than one thinks On that narrow hard bare and dark space a lot of us spend our lives Ivo Andri Published in 1945 but written earlier probably during the war years when Nobel Prize winner Andri had given up his diplomatic work and was living as uietly as anyone could in Belgrade during those years of upheaval The Bridge Over the Drina is the rather unusually told history of the town of Vi egrad in the south east of Bosnia near the border with Serbia The period of time covered by the book is exactly the lifespan of the monumental bridge which was built at Vi egrad around 1570 by the Ottomans and which survived undamaged until 1914 While the book focuses on the town and its inhabitants the bridge itself is the main character the hero the unifying force and the rationale of this entire chronicle The author succeeds in making his account as interesting and as full of suspense as any novel by weaving history myth and story together in a very natural way which allows the narrative to move fluidly from the general to the particular and back again so that the reader is swept along in the torrent of words and happenings There were violent times in the history of the bridge and I have to admit that I skimmed over the most harrowing episode which occurred near the beginning but fortunately there were no such scenes recounted The town of Vi egrad during the period of the narrative was home to Muslims and Jews Orthodox Christians and Roman Catholics Turks and Greeks Bosnians Croats and Serbs Montenegrins and Italians Galicians and Poles Austrians and Hungarians and according to Andri they all lived fairly peacefully together for the most part He implies that the takeover by the Hapsburg Empire towards the end of the nineteenth century and the dragging of the town into the modern age via the railway sounded the death knell of that peaceful co existence

REVIEW õ THECOLCHESTERCIRCLE.CO.UK Ô Ivo Andrić

γονότα των τελευταίων ετών στη Βοσνία και να διακρίνει τις Na Drini PDFEPUB or ανθρώπινες δυνάμεις που πάντα λειτουργούσαν κάτω από την πολυεθνική κρούστα και το μωσαϊκό των θρησκειών Το αριστούργημα του μεγάλου νομπελίστα συγγραφέα.. About five years ago an American friend of mine whose book taste I completely respected told me about this book He was so enthusiastic I knew someday I would read it even though I had never heard of the author never heard of the book and knew nothing about Bosnia I never suspected then that I would eventually be living in Istanbul someday be familiar with Ottoman history up close and have walked a historic Mimar Sinan stone bridge with my very own feet What a book What an author And what a translator This book is a haunting wonderful memoir exuisitely rendered in time and place A young Christian boy is taken to the Ottoman capital to serve the Ottoman Empire He converts Eventually he rises to a position of advisor to the Sultan The Balkan native decides to use his position to build a stone bridge designed by the great Ottoman architect Mimar Sinan to commemorate the land he came from and to glorify God The book The Bridge on the Drina is a fictionalized history of all that happened on that bridgeWe often assign metaphysical powers to grand urban assets like the Eiffel Tower but this book made the reader cherish a rural stone bridge as a precious jewel that made life grander and meaningful for all the villagers who come in contact with it Could a man made creation serve a nobler purposeIvo Andri is almost like a Balkan Mark Twain so great were his powers of observation about human nature sometimes wryly so You can not read this book without feeling he has an enormous love for humanity because he can describe people at their worst their weakest and best with such compassion and grace it s impossible not to love his writing for that fact alone I found myself writing down sentences within the book just to savor their genius later After I finished the book I looked the author up on Wikipedia and I realized I had no idea while reading the book what faith he was because he wrote about the Christian and Muslim villagers with such insight you could almost think he had both faiths in his family Ah such is the BalkansWhat a patriot this man was He had an ability to make the whole world care about his little corner and love it as he did I want to read everything else he has written