review Stalin author Ian Grey Ð eBook or Kindle ePUB

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Joseph Stalin was one of the most frightening figures of the twentieth century His name brings to mind brutal terrorism and ruthless oppression Yet as New York Times bestselling author Ian Grey shows at the core of the Man of Steel was a humble puritanical Georgian peasant What set him above others was his intelligence discipline perception indomitable will and abov. This book provides descriptions in great detail about the life and times of Stalin Exceptional information about his philosophies thought process mannerisms wartime decision making A wonderful in depth and factual presentation about the life and times of this great Russian patriot and leader

review ã eBook or Kindle ePUB Ð Ian Grey

Stalin author Ian Grey

Alin was able to disregard all sense of morality Yet through his magnetism he commanded the respect of his colleagues and the adulation of his people Even Winston Churchill held him in awe Stalin is a powerful history of Russia's evolution from backward nation to world power as well as a dramatic portrait of a man who was called both The Implacable and Beloved Fathe. Well written I found myself surprised that there was so little mention of the United States When the US entered WWII there was no mention of it until the first conference between Stalin Churchill and Roosevelt Other countries were mentioned only as they directly affected Russia which was as it should be but surprised me neverthelessStalin seems human than anything I d previously read about him and I found myself almost liking him in spite of all the millions he killed during his purges This was also an unusual take on the causes of the cold war Perhaps I m too democracy centric

Ian Grey Ð 3 summary

E all a messianic determination to lead Russia to a grand destiny Grey's comprehensive biography portrays Stalin as a complex paradoxical figure a leader whose power was rooted in the tsarist traditions he abhorred and whose tyranny was based on an ambition to ensure the strength of his party In his single minded dedication to the growth of Russia under communism St. Imagine reading a biography of Hitler that focused mainly on his love of his adopted Germany his oratory skills and his fondness for dogs You d come away with a nagging sense that story was somehow incomplete Hadn t you read somewhere that Hitler started a brouhaha which inconvenienced several people Wasn t Hitler in addition to being a gifted public speaker one of the worst mass murderers in history Ian Grey s book on Stalin feels like that imaginary overly selective Hitler bioGrey clearly admires Stalin whom he describes as a super patriot for his adopted Russia a tireless leader who singlehandedly micromanaged the USSR into becoming an industrial and military superpower that defeated Hitler saving Europe from German domination This Stalin sounds impressive Ian Anything else we should know about him Well Stalin was also modest treasured economy of words shunned luxury stayed up late like Hitler and had an impish sense of humour to match his impish stature Many Russians wept when he died in 1953 because he had made them proud of their country The great man had a remarkable ability to avoid remorse by staying laser focused on being the only guy in any room who knew what had to be done and was willing to do itDid this super leader have any flaws at all Grey admits that in his later years Stalin became a little paranoid seeing enemies everywhere At five foot six with a withered left arm Stalin may have had a touch of the Napoleon complex Stalin worked so darn hard making every decision in the USSR for decades that his first wife killed herself His kids were estranged from him His son was an alcoholic wastrel while daughter Svetlana kept disappointing her dad by getting involved with Jewish men Unlike Hitler Stalin was no speechmaker but both were micromanagers who overruled their trained military men and had zero grasp of economics Although Stalin killed even innocent people than Hitler the word genocide doesn t appear in Grey s book Like Stalin Grey has an impressive ability to compartmentalize topicsTake mass murder To make an omelette Grey tacitly suggests Stalin had to break a few million eggs He knew he had to drive Russians to sacrifice to meet his goals so what s a little deliberate mass starvation torture and constant political executionsIn a thoughtful introduction Grey points out that Russia has no history of democracy and has always been ruled by dictators He suggests that Russia s vast hard to defend geography makes autocracy a natural response to the exigencies of Russian national defenceOK but what about Stalin s ruthless implementation of Lenin s Communism which not only enslaved and killed tens of millions of people in the USSR but ruined the lives of millions of other people in Stalin s satellite state buffer zone in Eastern Europe and is still a cancer in China Viet Nam North Korea and Cuba among others Not really a focus for Grey Stalin wanted no repeat of the WWII slaughter Russians endured with over 15 million Russians killed He sought a buffer between Russia and the capitalist Western Europe especially Germany who he feared would invade the USSR again given the chance Stalin had the power to enslave Eastern Europe to create that buffer so he did The omelette analogy fits again Sure thanks to Communism a huge part of humanity has been deprived of political freedom and lives in fear misery and poverty but what you gonna do To read about what Communism actually did to people you need to read Satter s It was a long time ago and it never happened anyway or Solzhenitsyn s The Gulag ArchipelagoGrey s breathtaking selectiveness and failure to offer any moral or economic context for Stalin s monstrous actions might have been tolerable if he were a better writer Instead he annoyingly calls Stalin by an earlier nickname Koba for a chapter and spells Tehran two different ways Grey is not really a detail guy often throwing around numbers for things like industrial output without explaining their time frame or why they matter Grey never asks himself what life was like for the average Russian under Stalin She worked in The People s Glorious Tractor Factory 257 and was bludgeoned into ever higher output targets with no ability to share of the fruits of her own labours no freedom to criticize his government and no consumer goods other than vodka to dull the pain of missing family members killed by Uncle Joe


10 thoughts on “Stalin author Ian Grey

  1. says:

    Ian Grey's book is invaluable for its factual and objective thoroughness of one of history's most compelling subjects Joseph Stalin Many Western historians have branded this important figure as a cold and hollow character even sadistic and a

  2. says:

    This book is a long and well written biography of Joseph Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili a Georgian born on December 18 1878 known in history as Joseph Stalin who died in Moscow on March 5 1953Is the result of an extensive and valuable research that describes the efforts of a born Georgian of humble background with a cunning patience profound sense of mistrust and extraordinary political and military abilities that dedicated his life Since he w

  3. says:

    This book provides descriptions in great detail about the life and times of Stalin Exceptional information about his philosophies thought proces

  4. says:

    This is an incredibly researched beautifully written and unbiased account of one of the most important figures in the 20th century Grey is not a communist and in the preface he made clear his disdain of Marxism but Grey sets aside his own opinions and gives an excellent account of the Russian historical perspective Stalin is a complex figur

  5. says:

    An even handed treatment of a man of his timeStalin was undoubtedly the man made for the emergence of Soviet Uni

  6. says:

    Imagine reading a biography of Hitler that focused mainly on his love of his adopted Germany his oratory skills and his fondness for dogs You'd come away with a nagging sense that story was somehow incomplete Had

  7. says:

    A worthwhile read You don’t understand the 20th century if you don’t understand Stalin He is usually portrayed sympathet

  8. says:

    I haven't read that much about Russia so the book was informative I believe that it was accurate after having read other reviews I didn't know that at the end of Lenin's life he was not enad with Stalin I am going nuts over the use 0f He Himself again I don't understand the use of that Of course if it is he it has got to be himself Who else would it be?In the first months of 1935 several thousand Leningrad citizens were arrested

  9. says:

    Well written I found myself surprised that there was so little mention of the United States When the US entered WWII there was no mention of it until the first conference between Stalin Churchill and Roosevelt Other countries were mentioned only as they directly affected Russia which was as it should be but surprised me neverthelessStalin seems human than anything I'd previously read about him and I found myself almost

  10. says:

    This is a very interesting book It covers the beginnings of communism in Soviet Russia through to the death of Stalin The first half is really about Lenin At Lenin's death it then becomes biographical of Stalin To me the author is too much in