Capital The Eruption of Delhi Read & Download ↠ 104

Rana Dasgupta ð 4 Free read

M nierównościom społecznym a przemoc na ulicach osiągnęła niespotykaną dotąd skalęRana Dasgupta pisze o współczesnym Delhi Capital The ePUB #192 z liryzmem i empatią wsłuchując się w głosy jego mieszkańców miliarderów i biurokratów handlarzy narkotyków i przedsiębiorców mieszkańców slumsów i pracowników międzynarodowych korporacji Są pokolen. A disappointing work by an outsider trying to understand one of the major cities of the world through the eyes of its rich if not its richest The work is long verbose and offers little that is not already known to most This is not to say that there are no occasional flashes of insight and interest For example in the middle of the book where the author has a long conversation with a social worker and residents of a slum within the city and in the last chapter where he beautifully describes the river Yamuna which flows across the city To the non Indian reader the book provides a dystopian view of one of the emerging centres of world capitalism almost as a reassurance of the West s continued dominanceThe most fundamental flaw of the book is that it seeks to understand how the city s rich imagine their city The rich do not lack the means to convert their imaginations into reality whether these be opulent malls or gated communities It is the poor and the dispossessed whose imaginations need words to be described

Read & Download Capital The Eruption of Delhi

Capital The Eruption of Delhi

Po wprowadzeniu Eruption of eBook #180 otwartej gospodarki rynkowej w Indiach zapanował chaos niszczenia i tworzenia slumsy i targowiska były burzone a na ich miejscu wyrastały centra handlowe i apartamentowce powstawały oszałamiające fortuny młodzi ludzie robili zawrotne kariery a luksus był na wyciągnięcie ręki Ale transformacja dała też początek ogromny. This book is about Delhi post 1990s Rana Dasgupta successfully records the transition of Delhi from a sleeping monster to a raging one The city s landscape has changed in unprecedented ways new jobs multinational companies escalation in prices of real estate Apparently this has also impacted its people in different waysSo this book tells the story of Delhi and people who live in it He meets some of Delhi s ultra rich and talks to them about their ambitions and plans for the future what is it that moves these rich men to become richer to work harder and so forth Some of these stories give a glimpse of what is going on underneath Delhi s so called material success In these stories one can see how culture religion and global capital intersect and produce newer forms of being some of this is of course good and some is undoubtedly challenging For instance while the city is developing in all directions its middle and upper middle classes are growing richer they show complete disregard toward the poor In some ueer way in a profit driven society almost every body irrespective of where one is in the social hierarchy suffers the brunt of itAmong some of the better stories I particularly liked the one about the fashion designer Manish Arora He grew up in an ordinary middle class household and unlike many of his generation he took an unusual path and became an internationally renowned fashion designer Manish is openly gay Likewise there are stories of women who came out in a big way and joined all sort of professions which until now are the stronghold of men There is one exemplary story of a young girl from a very ordinary background who works full time for the rights of slum dwellers Usually it is the privileged women who go in their big cars to help the poorThere are also some interesting explanations about why Delhities behave in the way they do For instance why Delhi s Punjabis a wealthy community are so boisterous loud and go beyond their pockets when it comes to celebrations of all kind Rana claims that this is their way of dealing with the trauma of partition they still carry within them that pain and their excessive focus on celebration partying is a way to alleviate the pain In another context Rana Dasgupta wonders at how come people are so oblivious to the state and have almost zero level faith in it abilities to protect them Even a casual look at Delhi s streets this is also true of other major Indian cities one sees that people are uite oblivious to the miseries of those living o streets The author believes that this is because of the Indian caste system People belong to their caste first it is caste that provides them a safety net and people drive their sense of who they are through casteThe author only moved to India in recent years In his manner of speech and behaviour he comes across much like a Brit than an Indian In parts his explanations of people and their habits reeks of biases and prejudices For instance his attitude toward Delhi s elite is uite sympathetic They are somehow above his critiue as if by critiuing them he will harm himselfMy favourite chapter in the book is the last one on water systems in Delhi This is one of the most crucial chapters in the book Indian urban centres will have huge problems on water front Here we see how wrong policies greed can lead to a disaster of sorts In the past the water was used and stored in a way that suited to its geography In this chapter it is explained in a great detail how it worked With the dawn of pipelines and several decades later the eruption of industrial units around Delhi we have effectively choked its waters its rivers have been tamed into drains toxic ones This aspect of Delhi is perhaps for other India urban centers too scary because no one is paying attention as if Delhi can do without water as if coco cola will fulfill Delhi s water deficitOf course as a reader one can easily explicate oneself because Delhi s problem are after all only Delhi s problems This is only partly true If one just scratches a bit one sees how one is playing a part

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Iem na zakręcie a ich historie składają się na obraz miasta i społeczeństwa pogrążonego w wirze transformacji Delhi to literacki portret jednego z najszybciej rozwijających się współcześnie miast ale to także opowieść o tym co być może czeka The Eruption of eBook #180 nas wszystkich to błyskotliwa analiza rozwoju i przyszłości globalnego kapitalizmu. This is a searing read Dasgupta puts together a patchwork of intricate stories of various inhabitants of Delhi applying at once the keen eye of a reporter the insight of a psychologist the lyricism of a poet We hear the perspectives of overt Bentley driving farmhouse hopping billionaires as well as the shadow billionaires that are refused car loans because of how little income they actually declare of the patients turned victims of Delhi s corporate hospitals whose doctors are incentivised by the revenue they bring in of newly liberated women who may be empowered at their workplace but suffer humiliation in their own homes of Delhi s itinerant slum dwellers whose townships are constantly razed to the ground to make room for new developmentsof people who get rich uick by fitting themselves somewhere into the vast framework of black money and bribery that underpins the whole city and The snapshots are vivid detailed and disturbing and are set within context of historical stories such as that of Indira Gandhi s centralisation of power to which the author alludes most of the ingrained corruption in India today as well as as modern ones such as that of the 2010 Commonwealth Games an illustration of the extent to which the needs of the poor were swept aside in the name of everything modern as well as the scale of corruption in the city The author claims several times to have a complicated love hate relationship with the city and even the last line turns uite suddenly positive Delhiis one of the most beautiful places on earth These positive claims are the only ones that feel somewhat jarring and out of place because they appear to have so little basis within a picture that varies from depressing to downright frightening The book is uite long and paints maybe an extreme picture but I found it to be a worthwhile read


10 thoughts on “Capital The Eruption of Delhi

  1. says:

    Just a few days ago Narendra Modi banned the two largest currency notes in India 500 and 1000 rupees in an effort to catch those who are corrupt or practising tax avoidance A brief synopsis of the situation can be found in The New York Times if you want to learn the full story about the heavy burden of corruption that beleaguers Indian society then this is the book for you You need to gird your loins and stiffen your resolve beca

  2. says:

    I left Delhi to come back home to the south in February last year at which time Rana Dasgupta’s Capital was the ‘in book’ It t

  3. says:

    This book is about Delhi post 1990s Rana Dasgupta successfully records the transition of Delhi from a sleeping monster to a raging one The city's landscape has changed in unprecedented ways; new jobs multinational companies escalation in pri

  4. says:

    A disappointing work by an outsider trying to understand one of the major cities of the world through the eyes of its rich if not its richest The work is long verbose and offers little that is not already known to most This is not to say that there are no occasional flashes of insight and interest For example in the middle of the book where the author has a long conversation with a social worker and residents of a slum w

  5. says:

    Rana weaves a web of exuisite prose to study what capitalism has done to Delhi a city which had previously been traumatized by other catastrophic historical forces like imperialism and partition The author alter

  6. says:

    455 This is one of the best travelogues I have read it sometimes read like literary fiction with beautiful poetic passages there were great observations and insights and the sheer variety of ppl 20 who narrated their stories mostly in their own words The author perfectly understood where and how much commentary was needed And the commentary was not partisan it was not filled with bitter anger nor was it filled with sly flowery propaganda o

  7. says:

    It is an unfortunate reminder of how jaded Indian society is when you see all the reviews below panning this book as stuff we've heard before Seriously? Is everyone so resigned to living in a gangster state that the lucid and lurid anecdotes in this compendium no longer make people tremble with rage and indignation? Have we all just decided

  8. says:

    This is a searing read Dasgupta puts together a patchwork of intricate stories of various inhabitants of Delhi applying at once the keen eye of a reporter the insight of a psychologist the lyricism of a poet We hear the p

  9. says:

    Written from the point of view of a foreigner this book attempts to outline the character of Delhi the various tragedies developments and incidents that have made it what it is today The author talks about the Mughal period British period 1947 partition post partition IT boom 1970 Sikh riots patriarchy real estate and housing water crisis trying to make the reader understand how different leaders and governments have exploited various asp

  10. says:

    To cut the long story short this book could have easily done with a hundred pages less There's a lot of historical gleaning eventually ending up as rambling While it's good to see how Rana Dasgupta has tried to form the picture of something going through systemic decay repeating that in almost every chapter wit

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