Uprooted Read & Download ´ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook



10 thoughts on “Uprooted

  1. says:

    Just seventy five years ago the American government did something that most would consider unthinkable today it rounded up over 100000 of its own citizens based on nothing than their ancestry and suspicious of their loyalty kept them in concentration camps for the better part of four years Uprooted takes a close look at the history of racism in America and carefully follows the treacherous path that led one of our natio

  2. says:

    I've had this on my library wishlist for awhile and after finishing George Takei's They Called Us Enemy I decided it was time to listen to this I'm glad I read them in this order Takei's book was understandably focused on

  3. says:

    Numerous fiction and nonfiction books for kids had previously addressed forced internment camps in the United States during the 1940s but none so thoroughly as Albert Marrin's Uprooted The Japanese American Experience During World War II The

  4. says:

    Richie’s Picks UPROOTED THE JAPANESE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE DURING WORLD WAR II by Albert Marrin Knopf October 2016 256p ISBN 978 0 553 50936 6“A prominent supporter of Donald J Trump drew concern and condemnation from adv

  5. says:

    Overall I felt that Marrin provided a lot of background to what led to the government's mistreatment of Japanese Americans and he was also very clear that it was a mistake and violated Constitutional rights I expect this to end up o

  6. says:

    This is such an important read particularly in our current political climate

  7. says:

    When I finished this I wanted to turn around and reread it again I really liked author Albert Marrin's turn of phrases and found myself wanting

  8. says:

    Albert Marrin's books always disappoint He chooses excellent material but he is unable to communicate the information to his target audience He always goes into textbook mode and loses my interest If he can't keep an adult i

  9. says:

    I swear sometimes the nonfiction aimed at a younger audience is a better read than the stuff meant for adults Marrin lays out the important details of the relationship between the Japanese the Chinese and White Americans an

  10. says:

    My second book by this author I really enjoyed listening to them both Very informativeMy heart hurts for how much humans hurt each other “Hist

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Download Î PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ¿ Albert Marrin

Spicious of their loyalty kept them in concentration camps for the better part of four years   How could this have happened Uprooted takes a close look at the history of racism in America and carefully follows the treacherous path that led one of our nation’s most beloved presidents to make this decision Meanwhile it also illuminates the history of Japan and its own struggles with racism and. Richie s Picks UPROOTED THE JAPANESE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE DURING WORLD WAR II by Albert Marrin Knopf October 2016 256p ISBN 978 0 553 50936 6 A prominent supporter of Donald J Trump drew concern and condemnation from advocates for Muslims rights on Wednesday after he cited World War II era Japanese American internment camps as a precedent for an immigrant registry suggested by a member of the president elect s transition team We ve done it based on race we ve done it based on religion we ve done it based on region Mr Carl Higbie saidWe did it during World War II with Japanese He stood by his comments in a phone interview on Thursday morning saying that he had been alluding to the fact that the Supreme Court had upheld things as horrific as Japanese internment camps New York Times 111716 Trump Camp s Talk of Registry and Japanese Internment Raises Muslims Fears The whole world is festering with unhappy soulsThe French hate the Germans the Germans hate the PolesItalians hate Yugoslavs South Africans hate the DutchAnd I don t like anybody very much Sheldon Harnick The Merry Minuet popularized in 1959 by The Kingston Trio Rightly called humanity s most dangerous myth racism has no scientific basis Modern genetics neuroscience and physiology have proved that there are no basic differences between races Apart from skin color hair texture and facial features all human beings are essentially alike We inherit physical traits from our parents but social traits morality manners ideas religious beliefs work habits are not and cannot be inherited We acuire these from our upbringing education and life experiences In his impeccably researched and fascinating read UPROOTED author Albert Marrin frames the shameful story of America s locking up Japanese American citizens in concentration camps during World War II within a larger history of racism as practiced in the United States and by other nations There are some big surprises here Did you know that Dr Seuss drew racially demeaning anti Japanese cartoons during World War II Eleanor Roosevelt called the uprooting absurd vicious and pathetic and told FDR that the West Coast Japanese are good Americans and have the right to live as anyone else Dorothea Lange took hundreds of stunning candid photos of Japanese Americans incarcerated at Manzanar that were impounded by the government and only came to light a decade ago World War II was arguably shortened by years thanks to brave Japanese American soldiers most of whom had family imprisoned in camps The US War Department separated all blood plasma by the race of the donor until 1950From cover to cover UPROOTED is a gold mine for those of us who love learning the truth about American historyWhile it is nowadays common knowledge that Thomas Jefferson was a slave owning racist who fathered half a dozen children by a woman he owned it was a shock to read about Abraham Lincoln s pre presidential writings Lincoln was a white supremacist a believer in the superiority of the white race and laced his early speeches with this idea The Declaration of Independence he insisted was the white man s charter of freedom The founders had made the United States government for the white people and not for the Negroes The future sixteenth president called blacks members of the inferior races and Mexicans a race of mongrels From Franklin Delano Roosevelt s pre presidential writings we learn that the man ultimately responsible for the Japanese American concentration camps viewed people of Japanese origin racially as a group not as individuals Japanese were Japanese in his eyes they could no change their nature than a zebra could change its stripes to polka dots Japanese immigrants are not capable of assimilation into the American population FDR declared As president he insisted that the Japanese were a treacherous people and that aggression was in the blood It was with this mindset that in 1942 FDR signed Executive Order 9066 which permitted the exclusion of any or all people from defined military areas Without debate or dissent Congress set severe penalties for violating the order The order didn t specify any particular group but it seems everyone was in agreement as to whom they were targetingAccording to the author The presidential order and the law that confirmed it were unjust The American ideal of justice is based on individual rights and euality before the law It rejects any notion of group guilt We are responsible for what we do personally not for who we are or how we look Innocence or guilt cannot depend on race ancestry religion language family social class sex wealth politics feelings or ideas In violating this core principle decision makers failed to discharge their first duty to protect all the people eually Rather than confront fear and rumor with facts and reason they let them run wild even fed them in the name of national security Leaders failures set the stage for untold personal tragedies casting doubt on the very essence of America The author explains that there are recognized laws for rounding up and confining enemy aliens foreigners inadvertently stuck in America when their country and America become enemy combatants But taking away the constitutional rights of American citizens because their ancestors came from a country that was suddenly at war with America You d think that this would be unthinkable and unconscionable Yet that was the result of FDR s executive order and its enforcement against Japanese Americans As the result of American fear economic jealousy and racial bigotry than 100000 Japanese American citizens were forced to leave behind virtually all of their possessions and their pets as they were uprooted and imprisoned in concentration camps for the crime of being of Japanese descent Having pursued the American Dream they lost everything they d worked for and accumulated along with their Constitutional freedoms Racists con artists and opportunists got great bargains on the belongings that had to be left behind I was surprised to learn that Japanese Canadians suffered similar treatment in CanadaThe author explains how the War Relocation Authority WRA employed euphemisms and propaganda in seeking to influence public opinion about what was taking place A euphemism is a mild word or phrase that is used in place for another one that is normally considered blunt unpleasant or upsetting The term concentration camp was banned by those in charge of running the program Instead it was stated that Japanese Americans were evacuated to internment camps But as FDR s secretary of the interior Harold Ickes stated They were concentration camps nonetheless Interestingly the author points out the 1940s euphemistic term internment camp is still used today by authors journalists and textbooks Trump confidante Carl Higbie was only partially correct about the Supreme Court Albert Marrin details the cases brought by imprisoned Japanese Americans that reached the Supreme Court A court majority affirmed the curfew and exclusion orders but ultimately ruled that Japanese American prisoners were being denied habeas corpus and were Constitutionally entitled to either a court hearing or freedom This effectively ended their imprisonment The author concludes by drawing out the historical parallel between Japanese Americans during World War II and American Muslims today American Muslims have been vilified as a group over the past fifteen years The president elect has still not walked back his lie that he saw thousands and thousands of American Muslims cheering on New Jersey rooftops as the Twin Towers collapsed Will he try to bar all Muslims from entering the US Will he try to force Muslim American citizens to register like the Japanese Americans UPROOTED shows that in times of national crisis individual liberties can be far too easily abrogated Fortunately as UPROOTED teaches us the US Constitution safeguards these liberties and reuires due process if and when a president pursues such un American actionsRichie Partington MLISRichie s Picks

Read Uprooted

Uprooted

Xenophobia which led to the bombing of Pearl Harbor ultimately tying the two countries together   Today America is still filled with racial tension and personal liberty in wartime is as relevant a topic as ever Moving and impactful National Book Award finalist Albert Marrin’s sobering exploration of this monumental injustice shines as bright a light on current events as it does on the past.. Albert Marrin s books always disappoint He chooses excellent material but he is unable to communicate the information to his target audience He always goes into textbook mode and loses my interest If he can t keep an adult interested it s highly unlikely a teen is going to see it through He starts off effectively talking about the bombing of Pearl Harbor At this point I have high hopes it s going to be a good book Then he goes way off topic in my opinion talking about Japan s history with China It ruins the book for me He needs to tighten up his writing Stick to the topic Write in narrative mode rather than textbook mode And dig deep to connect the reader emotionally Books about detainment camps should strike a nerve If he s trying he s not successful

Download Î PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ¿ Albert Marrin

On the th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor comes a harrowing and enlightening look at the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II from National Book Award finalist Albert Marrin   Just seventy five years ago the American government did something that most would consider unthinkable today it rounded up over of its own citizens based on nothing than their ancestry and su. Numerous fiction and nonfiction books for kids had previously addressed forced internment camps in the United States during the 1940s but none so thoroughly as Albert Marrin s Uprooted The Japanese American Experience During World War II The book features an extensive historical lead in to explain why Japan sided with Germany and Italy in the war and what drove their ambition for world domination Racism and cynical politics reigned on all sides and Albert Marrin isn t afraid to give his young readers a look at some of the ugliest incidents surrounding the war The December 7 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor by Japanese aircraft was the first domino to fall but how did the world get to such a place To answer that we go back thousands of years to the birth of Japan More than four thousand islands of various size make up Japan From its earliest days eras of competent and incompetent leadership have come and gone as have peace and armed conflict with the rest of Asia Japan may have peaked with the age of the samurai warriors whose lives were defined by Bushido a code of conduct that placed personal and family honor as the highest value To prevent itself from being contaminated by China s opium crisis Japan closed to outsiders for many years but was pushed to reopen by American Commodore Matthew Perry in the 1850s Many Japanese hated the US for intruding now there was no way to restrict the influence of the Western world Samurais faded out of the culture and Japan modernized becoming a world power Critics from around the globe feared the West would come to regret coaxing Japan out of its closed society but for better or worse the world order had changed Traditionally ruled by emperors claiming a divine mandate Japan s military now seized control Stoking resentment of the US by pointing to incidents of shameful treatment against Japan the military adopted an aggressive stance on the world stage The 1937 Rape of Nanking left outsiders shellshocked the brutal assault on China had few modern parallels and images caught on film haunted the public Japan consolidated its burgeoning strength by joining Adolf Hitler s Germany and Benito Mussolini s Italy among the Axis powers and World War II was set into motion The attack on America s Pearl Harbor naval base was the last straw for US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt FDR who already held anti Japanese biases More than 100000 Japanese immigrants lived on the US West Coast many born and raised as American citizens called Nisei Were they loyal to the country of their birth or of their forefathers Driven by public panic and his own prejudice FDR signed executive order 9066 authorizing government detention of Japanese Americans in concentration camps without legal process It was a day of infamy every bit as dark as Pearl Harbor Japanese Americans expected reprisal after Pearl Harbor but nothing prepared them for the coming tribulation Federal agents raided their homes tearing through their belongings for evidence that they were spies Families were carted off to concentration camps held captive behind barbed wire fences Many Nisei had prospered financially but now lived in filthy overcrowded compartments threatened with violence if they attempted escape FDR claimed he had reason to suspect the Nisei of espionage but in truth the internment was based solely on the color of their skin and shape of their eyes no proof was presented that any Nisei were disloyal to the US The prisoners strove to live as decently as possible using skills from their previous lives to beautify the camps As World War II progressed American leaders realized Japan was not being careful communicating classified codes over the airwaves anyone who spoke fluent Japanese could translate them Despite their treatment by FDR many Nisei signed up as code breakers for the US military serving as loyally as though politicians had not robbed them of their constitutional rights The Yankee Samurai was destined to play a vital role in winning World War II Let not harsh tongues that wag in vain Discourage you In spite of pain Be like the cactus which through rain And storm and thunder can remain A poem by Kimii Nagata uoted on P 115 of Uprooted Via radio transmission and on the ground Nisei worked to give America the advantage over Japan Many white Americans looked with suspicion on Nisei following Pearl Harbor but their contribution to the Allied war effort was a fact Uprooted offers story after story of valor by these marginalized Americans who faced gruesome torture if captured by Japan If not for the Nisei experts project the war may have lasted some two additional years FDR died before Japan waved the white flag but executive order 9066 was still in effect and it took time for the bureaucracy to free the than 100000 Japanese Americans in concentration camps A wave of popular goodwill toward the Nisei backed by legal action in the courts eventually won the day but nothing could erase the trauma inflicted on Japanese Americans by their government The United States internment program of World War II shows that tyranny is never than a step away That is why the study of history is so important History is not destiny it describes the past but does not decide the future Yet it is a constant reminder of tragediesand a warning against repeating them Human beings can learn from experience And therein lies hope Uprooted P 209 The US was founded on the conviction that all humans are born with rights that government must not infringe on If it does the justification for that government to exist vanishes Uprooted explains it well The American ideal of justice is based on individual rights and euality before the law It rejects any notion of group guilt We are responsible for what we do personally not for who we are or how we lookIn violating this core principle decision makers during the internment crisis failed to discharge their first duty to protect all the people eually Rather than confront fear and rumor with facts and reason they let them run wild even fed them in the name of national security Leaders failures set the stage for untold personal tragedies casting doubt on the very essence of America Politicians illegally superseding the Constitution opened the door for them to commit atrocities against American citizens of Japanese ancestry the exact sort of overreach the Constitution was created to prohibit Well meaning dictators are often the most nefarious America s founders implemented safeguards against moments of crisis when the public are prone to accept government intrusions they normally wouldn t Politicians typically increase their own power at every opportunity so limiting them is essential to a free society What effect does a national or global catastrophe have on the collective psyche Historian John W Dower uoted in Uprooted points to the reaction of many Americans to Pearl Harbor Japanese aggression provoked a response bordering on the apocalyptic he said In the 1980s after overturning convictions of several Nisei interred at concentration camps Judge Marilyn Hall Patel spoke of that period in American history as a reminder of what can happen in a climate of uncontrolled anxiety It stands as a constant caution that in times of war or declared military necessitywe must be prepared to protect all citizens from the petty fears and prejudices that are so easily aroused Politicians prey on people s fear but we mustn t allow the cure to do harm than the disease Humans can emerge better off from any crisis as long as we don t forget we re on the same team regardless of ideological racial or other differences Ignoring this is what led to the Rape of Nanking in 1937 as Japanese soldiers admitted The Chinese didn t belong to the human racewe did not see Chinese people as human beings If we hold to our belief that all people are created eual possessing the same natural rights we can overcome the prejudice and politics that threaten to destroy us Every man woman and kid has a part to play Why do I only rate Uprooted two and a half stars Large portions of it are considerably better than that filled with emotional stories from Nisei betrayed by the US a nation they loved no less fiercely for the shape of their eyes The idea that individual behavior is paramount and group identity superfluous is presented in compelling fashion however Albert Marrin s political biases often bleed onto the page Criticizing administrative policy is fair but labeling Abraham Lincoln a white supremacist is inappropriate unless he explicitly said he considered whites superior to other races Marrin crosses the line in similar ways throughout this book In the final chapter he casts himself in the role of an Islamic religious scholar to delineate the true version of their faith An unbiased curation of the facts so readers can judge for themselves would be better These negatives damage what otherwise is a masterful book but they can t ruin Uprooted completely There s a lot to like and I almost rounded my rating to three stars I don t always agree with Albert Marrin s methods but he s a forceful documentarian and storyteller I haven t read another children s author like him