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Wives of Kindle #212 The reports and despatches of Eustace Chapuys Spanish Ambassador to Henry VIII's court from to have been instrumental in shaping our modern interpretations of Henry VIII and his wives Through his personal relationships with several of Henry's ueens and Henry himself his writings were filled with colourful anecdotes salacious gossip and personal and insightful observations of the key players at court thus offerin. I had high hopes for this book Mackay s stated intention of drawing a rounded depiction of an important figure is an interesting way to understand a complex and turbulent period in British historyHowever Mackay s less than rigorous treatment of the contemporary source material leaves us with a rather bland depiction of Chapuys despite her claims to the contrary Instead of analysis of the sources which rely far too much on diplomatic dispatches only the reader instead is treated to Mackay s own partisan paraphrasing And instead of using the sources to tell her reader about Chapuys she uses them predominately to retell the story of Henry and his wives A subject matter that has been dealt with in detail and with considerably skill by other historiansTo compound my disappointment in a hugely anticipated book is the scattering throughout of basic errors Whether it is attributing portraits to incorrect collections or wrongly stating that James IV of Scotland was planning an invasion in the 1530s he was killed at Flodden in 1513 these errors leap from the page If I were to be charitable these errors can be attributed to a poor editor but combined with my previous observations on Mackay s superficial treatment of source material it does make one wonder at Mackay s integrity as a historianOverall I think that Mackay s premise is an interesting one and I agree that Chapuys deserves much study in his own right and not merely to shed light on Henry s matrimonial affairs However I wish that Mackay had done so rigorously and drawn on a wider range of source material Instead I am left with neither a clear idea of Chapuys character nor much confidence in Mackay as a historian of any weighty authority

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The Six Wives of Henry VIII

O as the concubine or whore and reported Six Wives of PDF #8608 on each and every one of Henry's subseuent wives Jane Seymour Anne of Cleves Katherine Howard and Katherine Parr as well as the goings on at the Tudor court He retired in close to the end of Henry VIII's reign In approaching the period through Chapuys' letters Lauren Mackay presents a fresh perspective on Henry his court and the Tudor period as a wholeShow More Show Les. I really liked this book I thought this was well written and it was easy to read I think that Mackay has done a job in debunking all the Evil Chapuys myths that have been around for ages People automatically assume that Chapuys was Hispanic because he was Spanish Ambassador not true Chapuys was born in Annecy which is in south eastern France Another myth is that Chapuys was this ardent Catholic who hated anyone who was not Catholic Again not true Chapuys had friends from both sides Catholics and Protestants Infact he had developed a close friendship with Thomas Cromwell I think that it was sad that the two men really never had a chance to say a final farewell before Cromwell was executed There was a lot then what I mentioned here but overall I would recommend this book If you haven t read I would say that it was a must buy

Lauren Mackay » 0 Free read

G the single most continuous portrait of The Six PDF the central decades of Henry's reign The book is divided into the episodic reigns of Henry's ueens beginning with Chapuys' arrival in England in the middle of Henry's divorce from Katherine of Aragon Chapuys tirelessly defended Katherine and later her daughter Mary Tudor the future Mary I He remained as ambassador through the rise and fall of Anne Boleyn whom he would only refer t. This is a fascinating in depth look at one of the most prolific writers of the Tudor court Dr Mackay has clearly done her research creating an engaging narrative that draws you right in Highly recommend


10 thoughts on “The Six Wives of Henry VIII

  1. says:

    It’s about time someone took a long hard look at Eustace Chapuys Without us really noticing the dispatches of the Spanish Ambassador have shaped our interpretations of the court of Henry VIII especially the Catherine of Aragon Henry Anne Boleyn triangle which still attracts so much fascinated interest almost

  2. says:

    The reign of King Henry VIII is no mystery to us we seem to know every detail from household accounts foods that were consumed songs that were exalted clothes that were fashionable to battles treaties disloyalties and the intricate de

  3. says:

    I had high hopes for this book Mackay's stated intention of drawing a rounded depiction of an important figure is an interesting way to understand a complex and turbulent period in British historyHowever Mackay's less than rigorous treatment of the contemporary source material leaves us with a rather bland depiction of Chapuys despite her claims to the contrary Instead of analysis of the sources which rely far

  4. says:

    Few good books manage to paint a good portrayal of misunderstood historical characters just as Chapuys but Mackay has mana

  5. says:

    This is a fascinating in depth look at one of the most prolific writers of the Tudor court Dr Mackay has clearly done her research creating an engaging narrative that draws you right in Highly recommend

  6. says:

    This was a very interesting look at Eustace Chapuys Reading through Mackay's bibliography alone shows the effort the author went to in order to bring Chapuys for this generation to us I liked how nothing was whitewashed Chapuys comes

  7. says:

    In much the same way as Eustace Chapuys' negative appraisal of ueen Anne Boleyn helped shape her historiography for so many years the academic swing in the tragic ueen's favour particularly following Eric Ives's magisterial 1986 biography of her saw Chapuys cast in the light of a malign intriguer who got wrong than right when it came to Bol

  8. says:

    I really liked this book I thought this was well written and it was easy to read I think that Mackay has done a job in debunking all the Evil Chapuys myths that have been around for ages People automatically assume that Chapuys was Hispanic because he was Spanish Ambassador not true Chapuys was born in Annecy which is in south eastern France Another myth is that Chapuys was this ardent Catholic who hated anyone who was not Catholic Again no

  9. says:

    Like a lot of people my perception of Eustace Chapuys had been formed from his portrayal in non fiction books and the tv series The Tudors; however this book has completely knocked that on the headLauren's painst

  10. says:

    Excellent view based upon not a general stance but slightly sided Certainly we know a lot about Tudor court from the ambassador's correspondence; the book gives him good reverence