Dust AUTHOR Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor Read Ô PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook



10 thoughts on “Dust AUTHOR Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor

  1. says:

    This may be one of the most difficult books I've ever read and also in the end one of the most beautiful It's human voice is so immense so painful so incredibly hard to listen to at times but so real I have never been to Kenya and am not likely to ever get to Africa at this point in my life sadly but I feel I have seen a

  2. says:

    Dust opens with a shimmering vibrance that throws open the doors of perception indeed unscrews them from their jambs Odidi is running and remembering He remembers through objects the AK47 he throws away takes him b

  3. says:

    This winter offers an unusually rich bounty of novels about Africa “Radiance of Tomorrow” Ishmael Beah’s gracious story of rebu

  4. says:

    I think if I knew about Kenya I would've give this an additional star so take that as a failure of the reader not the writer The novel seems to be jam packed with the country's history people landscape and even perhaps mythology all

  5. says:

    This left me breathless Holy Sht I need to gather my thoughts but it was an amazing reading experience In the past I have struggled to connect with Kenyan Literature and it didn't help that my English teacher wasn't as enthusiastic about it either Majority of the books I came across were predominately politically driven and that just didn't suite my contemporary taste So I took upon myself to try out Dust by Y

  6. says:

    Thanks to Awuor Onguru for recommending this lovely dense novel Author Adhiambo has one of the freshest new voices out there weaving melancholy history and passion to examine a group of interconnected families during some of Kenya's m

  7. says:

    Lyrical poetic melancholic in short ALL THE FEELS Dust is a poetic family saga entwined with Kenya’s post colonial histor

  8. says:

    This book is a hard read A slog even Because of the themes it deals with And the writing style Choppy Fragmented in parts There's a good story But you will need patience And that's my attempt at recreating some of the prose in this book The prologue is what really sets the stage for this story A man is running chased by a mob as we are trea

  9. says:

    This book was hard for me I did not really like the writing style in many places The NYTimes review said Only the reader who truly loves books

  10. says:

    Sometimes you open a book and you know immediately whether the writing will grab you and the first sentences promise that the story will carry you to the last That was the case for me when I opened Dust Yvonne Adhi

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Read & Download É PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Ý Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor

Ries long left untouched and unleashed a series of unexpected events Odidi and Ajany’s mercurial mother flees in a fit of rage a young Englishman arrives at the Ogandas’ house seeking his missing father a hardened policeman who has borne witness to unspeakable acts reopens a cold case and an all seeing Trader with a murky identity plots an overdue revenge In scenes stretching from the violent upheaval of contem. I think if I knew about Kenya I would ve give this an additional star so take that as a failure of the reader not the writer The novel seems to be jam packed with the country s history people landscape and even perhaps mythology all of it starting with the murder of a young man and ending with a slow reveal of multiple secrets It is an absorbing immersion into the inner and outer lives of the characters and the countryAs one example of how much I don t know I thought the reference to a teacher killed while defending a colleague who was chopped to pieces in front of their students was perhaps created by the author When the man s name becomes important to one of the main characters giving him a feeling of power as he resists swearing to the oath I thought perhaps the name itself meant something I googled it and found that Aloys Kamau was a real man that there s a book about him subtitled Teacher and Martyr by Giuseppe Mina published by Paulines Publications Africa a Catholic press and that is all that s online The uestion of what endures and one of the answers being the land reminded me of Faulkner The poetic style at times was reminiscent of Michael Ondaatje but ultimately it s its own fitting the material though the sometimes staccato style is not usually one of my favorites perhaps another reason for my lack of a fifth starNo real happiness exists for any of the characters but there is bonding of former enemies of family members of lovers of those who turn mythic With the theme of past violences tortures and mutilations disappearances and erasures affecting the present 2006 I was reminded of Marra s A Constellation of Vital Phenomena These authors have turned horrible themes into beautiful literature but I d have given up the pleasure of reading these works for there being no need for them

Read Dust AUTHOR Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor

Dust AUTHOR Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor

Porary Kenya back through a shocking political assassination in and the Mau Mau uprisings against British colonial rule in the s we come to learn the secrets held by this parched landscape buried deep within the shared past of the family and of a conflicted nation Here is a spellbinding novel about a brother and sister who have lost their way about how myths come to pass history is written and war stains us forever. This book was hard for me I did not really like the writing style in many places The NYTimes review said Only the reader who truly loves books books full to brimming with imagery will appreciate the magic Owuor has made of the classic nation at war novel With splintered lyricism she tells the story of the Oganda familyOwuor s prose is a physical expression of the landscape it evokes raw fragmented dense opaue Much of it was too splintered and opaue for me On the other hand where it veered into a traditional narrative I liked it I stuck it out because I was trying to stay out of my comfort zone and read something new and I m glad I finished it The second half was narrative

Read & Download É PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Ý Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor

From a breathtaking new voice a novel about a splintered family in Kenya a story of power and deceit unreuited love survival and sacrifice Odidi Oganda running for his life is gunned down in the streets of Nairobi His grief stricken sister Ajany just returned from Brazil and their father bring his body back to their crumbling home in the Kenyan drylands seeking some comfort and peace But the murder has stirred memo. Dust opens with a shimmering vibrance that throws open the doors of perception indeed unscrews them from their jambs Odidi is running and remembering He remembers through objects the AK47 he throws away takes him back to a moment of transcendental communion through music and an occasion of buying a gift for his woman whose name he cries out silentlyHe discards the gun he calls out love returns to love His gift is lingerie What does it mean for two men to bond over the intimate feminine The suggested sexuality the proprietary his woman the fingerprints of the male gaze are wrapped up folded out of sight by music by this nostalgic encounterBut now he cries out love and the music inaudible has spoken to me I will heed this voice asking for its rhythm to be noticed for this is a poem in disguise Why is this woman named Justina and not Justine I feel it must be so Odidi can cry it out trisyllabic fortissimo Justiiinaaa And find it mirrors his own name in the desperation Odiiidiii Break Break BreakOdidi runs Not in the progressive tense that conveys the immediate present the hourglass pinch of action the tense we use on the telephone the tense of excuse the fixed plan I can t talk I m running no I m washing my hair No Odidi runs in the tense of habit the tense of timeless truth the tense of a state maintained He is trapped in the poem he will always be running You can t live in the songs of people who don t know your name he remembers like a brushstroke on his bare back for the carnography the body story of Odidi is being painted Owuor is marking her artistry Odidi frozen in a history a painting sees his life flash before his eyes to the soundtrack of Fela Kuti He remembers his little sister the way I remember my little brother there s no sentimentality by the way Owuor paints calmly wreaking devastation in truth There s only time for a glimpse a waft a sueeze of hands and the scene ends rises out of sight to cast its fluttering shadow over that sister Ajany whose story this is reallyIf this book is accurately described as a sustained poem of grief and anguish its object is not only a loved person but surely a country a hope a generation of stolen people If you aren t aware of Kenya s history this is not the place for 101 but the country s pain is braided into that of Ajany and her family and the mysteries that unravel around them have deep and widely spread political roots that become exposed in all their ugliness as hidden stories are scraped to the surface One of these concerns a scam Odidi s company was involved in narrated by his former colleague I reacted in horror with Odidi and Ajany and Owuor but the punishment we all receive for it is a heavy blow and the narrative has to work hard to balance that dose of despair laterSynthesising elements of raw history and mental decolonisation into a deeply personal story a struggle that claims and insists on its specificity in the mode of extremely poetic prose reminded me of Leslie Marmon Silko s book Ceremony The character of Galgalu who often acts as a life saving suture in the Oganda family personifies the novel s sensitivity to ritual a vast ponderous impulse towards healing that is nonetheless enacted or transacted through unceremonious gestures such as Ajany giving Galgalu her necklace of amethyst Another writer I was reminded of was Moniza Alvi whose poetry about trauma and recovery contains the same depth of empathy and employs similar truncated injured rhythms to embody its hurt subjectsThe front of my edition bears the comment Owuor s prose is a physical expression of the landscape it evokes which rather awkwardly suggests the relationship between text and place the arid homeland sketched in chopped grainy sentences but her prose successfully embodies noisy silences speech that conceals and most interestingly to me bodies themselves and the auras of disdain envy desire and fear that billow shift and eventually fade around them particularly Justina for reasons I don t want to spoil This delicate skill made me love the book as did Owuor s rejection of the easy inconclusive ending another parallel with Ceremony the subject is too acute to be refused resolution by lack of authorial courage or love