Free read ´ Wonderful Life The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History ↠ E-book, or Kindle E-pub

Summary Wonderful Life The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History

High in the The Burgess MOBI #238 Canadian Rockies is a small limestone uarry formed million years ago called the Burgess Shale It hold. A decent but certainly out of date book The most interesting section is that regarding the anatomy of the Burgess biota and the historical narrative of Whittington Conway Morris and Briggs is also a highlight The technical details of chapter three might throw some readers off but I found them to be fascinatingUnfortunately most of the book is out of date Most of the weird wonders that Gould describes have been taxonomically re evaluated in the previous two decades and technical developments in systematics the concept of stem groups in cladograms now show that much Burgess biota ironically belong closer to the original classifications of Walcott Much of the biota are now considered to be stem groups of modern taxa evolutionary aunts and unclesI also found Gould s continued emphasis on the cone of increasing diversity to be uite exhausting Based on G

Free read ✓ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ò Stephen Jay Gould

Wonderful Life The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History

The remains of an ancient sea where dozens of strange creatures lived a forgotten corner of evolution preserved in awesome detail In t. The Burgess Shale is a fossil deposit of importance eual to that of the Rift Valley sites of East Africa in that it provides truly pivotal evidence for the story of life on earth The shale comes from a small uarry in the Canadian Rockies discovered in the early 20th century by Charles Walcott then a leading figure at the Smithsonian The Burgess fossils come from the Middle Cambrian Period around 350 million years ago They form one of the earliest assemblages of soft bodied creatures from the first era 1 0 multicelled animals They include various worms crustaceans etc but also a large number of uniue and unclassifiable forms In the late 60s Harry Whittington began to study the Burgess fossils in detail and discovered that many of them beloned to lineages which left no modern descendants The identification of Marrella Opabinia and other strange Cambr

Stephen Jay Gould ò 9 Free download

His Wonderful Life MOBI #224 book Stephen Jay Gould explores what the Burgess Shale tells us about evolution and the nature of history.. Stephen Jay Gould performs a really unlikely feat in this book he makes arthropods as fascinating as dinosaurs In fact he makes a subject that could be extra ordinarily dull the process of taxonomic classification of a bunch of extra old fossils of small suidgy animals into a dramatic and gripping read THIS REVIEW HAS BEEN CURTAILED IN PROTEST AT GOODREADS CENSORSHIP POLICYSee the complete review here


10 thoughts on “Wonderful Life The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History

  1. says:

    A book about wonder and a wonderful book The story of the Burgess Shale—from its initial misinterpretation to its reassessment 50 years later—is mind blowing This limestone outcropping which sits at an altitude

  2. says:

    A decent but certainly out of date book The most interesting section is that regarding the anatomy of the Burgess biota and the historical narrative of Whittington Conway Morris and Briggs is also a highlight The technical details of chapter three might throw some readers off but I found them to be fascinatingUnfortunately most of the book is out of date Most of the weird wonders that Gould describes have been

  3. says:

    This book was unlike anything else I'd ever read I suspect because it owes something to the scientific monograph Maybe? Not having ever read a scientific monograph they don't even call them that these days I don't know Anyway Gould repeated and repeated and repeated the same conclusions over and over and over and over unti

  4. says:

    “The drama I have to tell is intense and intellectual It transcends these ephemeral themes of personality and th

  5. says:

    Wonderful bookSome of the science has been overtaken in the uarter century since it was written but mainly in the details not in the main thrust of the arguments And it is very much a long argument if mostly with someone other than me

  6. says:

    The Burgess Shale is a fossil deposit of importance eual to that of the Rift Valley sites of East Africa in that it provides truly pivotal evide

  7. says:

    The Burgess Shale's creatures with their anatomies as striking as bizarre are a perfect illustration of the hist

  8. says:

    Wonderful Life is pretty well wonderful If your curiosity about the Burgess Shale or the weird and wonderful beings of the Cambrian period needs sating this book should than do it It is uite dense — Gould may have been a popular science writer but he didn’t dumb it down — but it’s worth the time investm

  9. says:

    Stephen Jay Gould performs a really unlikely feat in this book; he makes arthropods as fascinating as dinosaurs In fact he makes a subject that could be extra ordinarily dull the process of taxonomic classification of a bunch of extra old fossils of small suidgy animals into a dramatic and gripping read THIS REVIEW HAS BEEN CURTAILED IN PROTEST AT GOODREADS' CENSORSHIP POLICYSee the complete review here

  10. says:

    I'm not saying anything startling or new when I say this book is awesomeSo for one thing it's a book about writing and about mythology and ho

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